GRENADIER LAND TITLE HISTORY

GRENADIER AND FOX ISLANDS

 

LAND TITLE HISTORY OF 107 ACRE PROPERTY IN BASIN HARBOR GRENADIER ISLAND CAPE VINCENT NEW YORK 1824-2012

The 107 acre lot in Basin Harbor was part of the 3,670,715 acre Macomb Tract.This tract included much of northern New York, along the St. Lawrence River and eastern Lake Ontario, including the Thousand Islands, at about eight cents an acre. The purchase was divided into ten large townships. From this purchase are derived the deeds for all the lands that are now included in Lewis, Jefferson, St. Lawrence and Franklin Counties, as well as portions of Herkimer and Oswego Counties.

The Macomb Purchase was especially successful in straightening out the previously tangled Mahair Purchase of 1786.

In 1803 Samuel English and Hezekiah Barret petitioned the legislature of New York of the grant of Grenadier Island, which they evidently supposed belonged to the State, and which they proposed to settle within twelve months after such grant was made; but no good title could be given until the national boundary-line had been agreed upon. This was done in 1819; the islands were patented soon after, and by a survey made in 1823 Grenadier was put down as containing 1290 acres. John Mitchel was probably the first settllor.

In 1819, the line dividing Canada and New York was established.

Grenadier Island was patented to Hezekiah B. Pierrepont, Joshua Waddington and Thomas L. Ogden on October 1, 1824.On November 10, 1824 title to the island became vested in Pierrepont, who sold it (and Cherry Island) to William and Gerardus Post, of New York, on February 19, 1825 for $7,000.The Posts sold land to settlers but retained the 107 acre parcel because of its strategic location in Basin Harbor which was the safest harbor on the Eastern end of Lake Ontario.

In 1819, the line dividing Canada and New York was established.

Grenadier Island was patented to Hezekiah B. Pierrepont, Joshua Waddington and Thomas L. Ogden on October 1, 1824. On November 10, 1824 title to the island became vested in Pierrepont, who sold it (and Cherry Island) to William and Gerardus Post, of New York, on February 19, 1825 for $7,000. The Posts sold land to settlers, despite the number of squatters who had taken up residence on the island and who were reluctant to vacate their improvements

The pioneer of Grenadier Island is supposed to have been John Mitchell, a squatter, who built a cabin(Stone House) after the War of 1812 (Emerson 1898). At the time the Posts assumed ownership, there were at least 14 families living on the island. The inhabitants were engaged in lumbering, limited farming, and fishing. The island changed ownership several times. In 1822, there were aproximately 20 families residing on the island.

A log school house was built that year near Basin Harbor on the island's main north-south road.see "School House" Chapter in  this web site.

In 1823, Grenadier Island was surveyed and recorded as comprising 1,290 acres. By the mid-nineteenth century the island had a cheese factory.

 In 1902 an impressive estate was built on Halcyon point the northeastern tip of the island. Edward B. Talcott of New York.

Talcott had visited Cape Vincent and its vicinity for twenty years before he purchased a nearly mile long tract along of waterfront on Grenadier Island (Casler 1906:127).

In addition to his home, he constructed a building for helpers and guides, cold storage, a boathouse, and a wharf. Mrs. Josephine Weeks and her

husband, Judge Bartow S. Weeks, improved what became the Moro Estate at Halcyon Point for a reported quarter of a million dollars (Thousand Islands Sun 1952).

The one time "magnificent" stone Moro Castle with its "luxurious furnishings" became one of the finest estates in Eastern

Lake Ontario (Thousand Islands Sun 1952). In 1952, the 101-acre estate was purchased by the local firm of Wagoner & Holman and was then placed at auction (Watertown Times 1952). Avid fisherman and duck hunter William L. Clay of Rochester, New York, purchased the estate and Basin Harbor at auction for $5,500 (Thousand Islands Sun 1952). The contents of the house

were also auctioned off.

In 1960, Sandra C. Uhlein purchased the estate from the Estate of William Clay .

In 1998 John W. Uhlein III purchsed same property from his mother Sandra. C. Uhlein

Previous owners of record were as follows:

 

Grenadier Island was patented to Hezekiah B. Pierrepont, Joshua Waddington and Thomas L. Ogden on October 1, 1824.

On November 10, 1824 title to the island became vested in Pierrepont, who sold it (and Cherry Island) to William and Gerardus Post, of New York, onFebruary 19, 1825 for $7,000. The Posts sold land to settlers.

PREVIOUS  OWNERS OF RECORD OF 107 ACRE BASIN HARBOR PROPERTY

                                            1829-2013

 

1-  Paul & Jacob Brown 1829-1830

General Jacob Brown, under the command General  Wilkinson, moved with General Wilkinson from Henderson Harbor on October 19-20 1813 as part of an effort in the War of 1812 to capture Montreal from the British.

When the War of 1812 began, Brown was a brigadier general in the New York militia, having been appointed to that rank in 1811. Though he opposed the war, he organized the defenses in the Great Lakes region. On 29 May 1813, troops led by Brown defeated the British at the Battle of Sackett's Harbor.

As a result of his actions there, he was given a commission as a brigadier general in the regular army. The next year his army captured Fort Erie in Ontario. He was wounded twice at the Battle of Lundy's Lane, one of the bloodiest engagements of the war for both sides. His last battle of the war was the Siege of Fort Erie in 1814, which resulted in an American victory. His successes, in what was the northwest U.S. at that time, made him a national hero. To express its appreciation, Congress authorized the award to Brown of a Congressional Gold Medal on 3 November 1814. General Brown was the 24th American to receive the Congressional Gold Medal.

 To express its appreciation, Congress authorized the award to Brown of a Congressional Gold Medal on 3 November 1814.

General Brown was the 24th American to receive the Congressional Gold Medal.

Brownville, NY is named after General Brown. The Brown Mansion is a landmark in the Town of Brownville.

See http://www.villageofbrownvilleny.org// for a description of his early life and the part he played in settling Northern, NY.

For further biographical detail on General Brown's life and the important part he played in the War of 1812 see :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Brown

 

 

2-  Henry Ainsworth June 1830-  March 1836

 

Henry Ainsworth, was a Revolutionary soldier and native of Vermont, married Hannah Troop and their children were Judah, Henry, Danforth, Avery, Sarah, and Willard. The latter was born in St. Albans, Vermont, in 1792 whence he removed to Cape Vincent soon after his marriage where he died in 1865. He was a farmer, served in the War of 1812, and was supervisor of this town for nine consecutive years. He represented the town of Lyme at the time of the division of the town setting off Cape Vincent.

 

3- Abal Franklin  Farmer Cape Vincent June 1830- March 1836

 

4- Frederick Orton February 1836- March 1939 Farmer Cape Vincent, NY. Buried Saint Johns Cemetery, Jefferson County, NY

 

5- Marcellus Stowe March 1836-June 1859

 

6- Frederick and Adolph Iselin February 1859 March 1867

 

7-Carlton Collins February 1867- October 1875

 

8-Lorenzo Dodge  March 1869-October 1875

 

9- Dodge family various June 1893-October 1901

 

10- Louis Fitzgerald August 1899-October 1901

 

11- Charles Jones August 1899-October 1901

 

12- Little Grenadier Club November 1899-1902

13- Edward Talcott 1902-1940

In 1902 an impressive estate was built on Halcyon point the northeastern tip of the island. Edward B. Talcott of New York.

 

Talcott had visited Cape Vincent and its vicinity for twenty years before he purchased a nearly mile long tract along of waterfront on Grenadier Island (Casler 1906:127).

In addition to his home, he constructed a building for helpers and guides, cold storage, a boathouse, and a wharf.

14- Josephine and Bartow Weeks 1940- 1952

Mrs. Josephine Weeks and herhusband, Judge Bartow S. Weeks, improved what became the Moro Estate at Halcyon Point for a reported quarter of a million dollars (Thousand Islands Sun 1952).

The one time "magnificent" stone Moro Castle with its "luxurious furnishings" became one of the finest estates in Eastern. On Mrs. Weeks death she left the estate to her son Norwood Smith and his wife Helen who were good friends of Dr. and Mrs.Howard Cooper from Watertown, NY. Their daughter Sandra married John Wyatt Uhlein.

16- William L. Clay 1952-1960

16- John Wyatt Uhlein Sr 1960- 1998

Wyatt Sr leased the estate from William Clay from 1952 until he purcahsed the eatate in 1960

 

17- John W. Uhlein III 1998 to present-